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DDHS sets a Gold Standard when it comes to teaching Financial Literacy

IMAGE: DDHS Business Education Teachers Jodi Scott (left) and Lori Grover show off the school's Next Gen Personal Finance Gold Standard award poster. DDHS is one of just xxx schools in the country recognized for this high achievement.

DDHS Business Education Teachers Jodi Scott (left) and Lori Grover show off the school’s Next Gen Personal Finance Gold Standard award poster. DDHS is one of just 600 schools in the country recognized for this high achievement.

Delavan-Darien High School has been awarded a Next Gen Personal Finance Gold Standard distinction for its commitment to educating ALL students in 21st Century personal finance skills.

This past summer, NGPF analyzed 11,000 US high school course websites (see research) to measure student access to comprehensive financial education.

DDHS was one of only 600 high schools nationwide to deliver the Gold Standard of a required, standalone, semester+ personal finance course. The award letter says DDHS is one of the few schools in the nation that “guarantee that all students — not just a privileged few — learn the financial skills they need to build bright futures.”

The school received a Gold Standard School Banner to be displayed in the lobby or the hallways where this crucial learning happens.

 

The NGPF research showed that just 1 in 6 students nationwide graduate with a required personal finance course like DDHS offers.

“This goes a long way in explaining America’s spiraling student debt crisis — most students simply aren’t prepared to make serious financial decisions after graduation,” said NGPF’s Tim Ranzetta.

AT DDHS, students have options when it comes to learning about financial literacy and fulfilling graduation credit requirements.

There is a Personal Finance course, for juniors and seniors. The course has five main themes: Planning Personal Finances, Banking and Credit, Investing Financial Resources, Protecting Your Finances, and Business Finance Basics. In it, students create a personal budget and learn how to use it. Students also learn how to file a 1040EZ tax form, compare advantages and disadvantages of renting vs. buying a house, compare the advantages and disadvantages of leasing vs. buying a car, and they learn about home, automobile, health, disability, and life insurance. Students also evaluate savings and investment options to meet short-and long-term goals and analyze factors that affect the choice of credit, the cost of credit, and the legal aspects of using credit. After taking the course, students are more knowledgable about managing money effectively and developing financial goals and budgets, skills usable throughout their lives.

The DDHS Sustainable Urban Agriculture course has also been identified by the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction as fulfilling the school’s “Financial Literacy” course requirement. In it — alongside learning about agri-business — students learn about the importance of economics and basic economic principles. They become able to differentiate among economic resources, practice maintenance of regular checking and savings accounts, identify personal financial management tools and strategies, explain the benefits and liabilities of owning an agricultural business, and prepare a personal budget. This course is also for juniors and seniors.

For questions about our business education opportunities, contact DDHS business education teachers Jodi Scott or Lori Grover. For questions about our agricultural sciences opportunities, contact Marty Speth.

Also, see our DDHS Education Guide.

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